Kong: Skull Island (2017) – Film Review

Jordan Vogt-Roberts directs his first major film with ‘Kong: Skull Island’, another remake of the classic monster, this time however, with a different time-period and some very impressive visuals. All equaling to a film which is pretty fun overall, despite still being filled with a variety of issues throughout it’s run-time.

Shorty after the Vietnam war in 1973, a team of scientists explore an uncharted island in the Pacific, soon venturing into the domain of the mighty ‘King Kong’, and must fight their way through an onslaught of dangerous creatures to escape the deadly: ‘Skull Island’.

Just from a quick glance at the film it’s very obvious that the film takes heavy inspiration from the iconic war epic: ‘Apocalypse Now’. Which is by no means a bad thing, as the visuals are definitely one of the better elements of the film, as they really add to the 1970s time-period and enhance the experience of what could’ve been your standard bland monster blockbuster.

The all-star cast of Thomas Hiddleston, Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, John Goodman, Toby Kebbell and my personal favourite John C. Reilly, are all decent in their roles despite the characters not being given much depth beyond a few short scenes, as due to the huge size of the cast, many characters become simply clichés and not much more. Aside from Samuel L. Jackson and John C. Reilly’s characters, who both play into the theme of going mad after war, which I personally found very interesting and wish the film explored further. Rather than focusing on some of the awful comedic moments the film tries to cram into the story.

The cinematography by Larry Fong is one of the weaker elements of the film, as although there are plenty of attractive shots throughout the story, this is mostly due to the film’s excellent use of it’s ranged colour palette and CGI effects. The original score by Henry Jackman however is one of his better scores in my opinion, as throughout the narrative the soundtrack always adds to the adventurous tone of the film, using tribal drums to add to every encounter with ‘Kong’. The film also uses a variety of songs from the 1970s to further push the time-period, and while this sometimes works effectively, it can also feel very forced at points.

Throughout the film the CGI effect look pretty great (as similar to many of the other films within this new franchise of monster flicks) as ‘Kong’ always feels very imposing and powerful, with every detail from his scars to his hairs looking phenomenal. Despite the film’s use of slow-motion making the film feel very cheesy during some of the action scenes. This also goes for many of the other creatures throughout the film, as ‘Skull Island’ is brimming with a variety of unique monsters, my personal favourite being the sinister: ‘Skullcrawlers’, ‘Kong’s adversaries on the island.

The main issue I took with the last remake of the iconic monster before this one, that being Peter Jackson’s ‘King Kong’ from 2005, was the overly long run-time. As for some reason the film was over three hours long with mostly nothing but constant CGI effects and action scenes throughout it’s run-time. However, ‘Kong: Skull Island’ succeeds here, as the film is much shorter and utilizes quick pacing to always keep the story moving.

Overall, ‘Kong Skull Island’ is pretty enjoyable, as while filled with a variety of problems, mosltly in reagrds to the film’s characterisation and weak story elements, the film still manages to be exciting through it’s great use of CGI effects and some thrilling action scenes, all backed-up by a great original score and an intresting use of the 1970s time-period. A low 7/10 for ‘Kong’, in need of improvement for sure, but you can still get something out of this one.

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